2020 Lemon Aid New Car Reviews - Luxury

 

 

Acura TLX  Cadillac CT6  Lexus ES  Nissan Maxima 
Audi A4  Genesis G70  Lexus IS  Tesla Model 3 
BMW 3-Series      Genesis G80  Lincoln Continental  Toyota Avalon 
BMW 4-Series 

Infiniti Q50 

Lincoln MKZ  Volvo S60 
Buick Regal  Infiniti QX50  Mercedes-Benz C-Class  Volvo V60 
Cadillac CT5  Jaguar XE     

2020 Infiniti QX50 

 


 

 

 

What’s new
Pure replaces the Luxe trim for 2020 and the ProActive model takes the place of the previous ProAssist variant. Blind spot, rear cross traffic and lane departure warning warnings, reverse auto braking and the iOS-Android cellphone interface are all standard this year. Numerous small packaging changes.  

Performance
With strong acceleration and flexibility, the QX50's radical variable compression ratio turbocharged 2L four--the first in a production car--is a success. However, engine refinement when leaving from a stop and when accelerating briskly, is disappointing for a luxury vehicle. Infiniti needs to enhance sound insulation to remove the unpleasant engine noise as it could be a deal-breaker for QX50 intenders. Observed fuel economy of 11.3L/100km was higher than expected, especially as premium fuel is required.
The sole transmission offered is a CVT that mimics the stepped changes of a conventional automatic transmission unless you demand maximum acceleration, when it holds onto a gear ratio until the driver backs off the throttle.
The QX50's steering is touch slow to react, lacks feel, but is nicely weighted and faithfully holds its line on the highway.
Despite massive 20 inch wheels on our Autograph range-topper, the QX50 smothers minor road imperfections effortlessly but loses its composure when it encounters more challenging road surfaces. The QX50's suspension is uninvolving but grips well and feels stable, despite more lean than expected.
The brake pedal feels soft but response is linear and stopping power is very good.
With upgraded leather upholstery, ultra-suede headliner, windshield pillars, door, dash and centre console accents, convincing faux alloy accents and open-pore wood trim, the cabin of the QX50 Autograph model driven by the APA was truly sumptuous. Few vehicles, even at this price level, can equal the sheer opulence of the QX50's cabin. The driver faces clear gauges separated by a configurable electronic readout. Shared with the Infiniti Q50, the dual screen navigation, audio and climate controls work well enough. The air-conditioning cannot be set lower than 18 degrees centrigrade and its performance on 30 centrigrade plus degree days was found wanting. The cooled front seats work very well. The front seats are supportive and room is ample. Rear seat riders enjoy a supportive seat and good legroom but toe space under the front seats is tight. The rear seat itself can be moved fore and aft to maximize rear seat legroom or cargo space. Though the glazed portion of roof is massive, the actual opening sunroof aperture is small. Impressive audio quality from the brand-name sound system. The trunk is long, wide and deep below the window line.

Comments
The QX50 changed focus last year; moving from a premium rear-wheel drive platform derived from a luxury sedan to mainstream front wheel drive underpinnings. Previously built in Japan, the new QX50 now hails from low-cost Mexico. 
The big Nissan V6 that powered the previous QX60 was jettisoned in favour of the powerful 2L four which Infiniti refers to as the VC-Turbo, VC standing for variable compression. The engine adjusts the compression ratio between 8:1 (for performance) and 14:1 (for fuel economy). Former Swedish carmaker Saab toyed with this idea and won several awards for the technology, but abandoned the concept after General Motors (Saab's owner at the time) cut off funds for further development. This technology is innovative but unproven and complex; potential owners will be comforted by Infiniti’s six-year/110,000 kilometer powertrain warranty.

Pricing
The Pure base model does include heated power front seats, forward collision, blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings, autonomous emergency braking, including reverse and LED lighting, but suffers the indignity of vinyl seats. Upgrading to the Essential trim brings a large format sunroof and navigation to the car, but retains the vinyl seats, at a price that is a bit inflated given the content. The ProAssist trim is the base model with leather seating, and adds adaptive cruise control and a name brand audio system, for a reasonable premium. The Sensory trim includes premium leather, heads up display, a tow package, lane keep assist and ProPilot, a rudimentary lane centring device, as well as sumptuous faux suede cabin accents, at a bargain price. The Autograph range-topper doesn't seem to offer anything of value for the money. While the current QX50, based on a mainstream platform and powered by a four, is a lesser concept than the premium platform, previous-generation V6-powered predecessor, the current QX50 has been a great success, with sales increasing significantly over those of the previous car. Many previous QX50 owners are returning, but conquest sales from brands like Audi, have become common. The Pure and Essential trims are the most popular with buyers. The QX50 is a good lease value for 2020. 

Reliability
New vehicle, not rated. The new 2L variabile compression ratio turbo four is unproven but is compensated for by a six year/110,000 km powertrain warranty. An extended powertrain warranty is recommended if you plan to keep the vehicle past the powertrain warranty period. 

Specifications


Body Style:  4HB
Occupants:  2/3

Engines: 2L-4 T (268 HP) 


Transmissions: CVT 
Drive Layout: All-wheel drive

City Fuel Economy: 10.8L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  8.3L/100 km

Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning, including pedestrians, autonomous emergency braking, including in reverse and blind spot, rear cross traffic and lane departure warnings. Optional adaptive cruise control 


Additional airbags: Dual front knee airbags
Warranty: 4/100,000, 6/110,000

Current Generation Debut:  2019

Country of Origin:  Mexico


IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: G

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Infiniti Q50

 


 

 

What’s new
The LUXE trim has been renamed Pure. A rear seat door path alert has been added. The infotainment system, called In-Touch is new as is the keyfob for the car. The iOS-Android cellphone interface is standard for 2020. The Red Sport gains a new base model this year and the whole lineup is subject to numerous minor packaging changes and trim updates for the Q50 in its seventh year on the market. 

Performance
Rated at 400 horsepower, the 3L twin turbo V6 that powers the ultimate Q50, the Red Sport,  furnishes bountiful power along with a stirring soundtrack. The detuned version of the turbo V6, with 300 horsepower, delivers abundant power and is significantly less expensive than the Red Sport. The transmission was slightly reluctant to kick down in normal mode but the transmission became more pro-active when the Sport and Sport+ modes were selected. Unlike the electronic toggle that selects gears in many luxury cars, the gear selector on the Q50 is a conventional device that has a direct mechanical connection with the transmission. 
Though nicely weighted, the Q50's steering, which is activated by a drive by wire system, feels, not surprisingly, feels a bit remote, even when turning large, low-profile 19 inch wheels and tires. Handling is stable and unflappable and the Red Sport's ride, though firm, is surprisingly comfortable. 
The cabin of the Red Sport, though nicely appointed, is not overtly luxurious in an old school wood-accented way. The driver faces large, clearly-marked gauges that have trim rings featuring bizarre and totally superfluous fluting. The controls for the climate system can be accessed both via buttons or a dashboard screen, which will let those familiar with conventional controls to use them and tech-forward fans an operation mode they believe is futuristic. The audio controls work well but tuning by a toggle rather than a knob is counter-intuitive. The substantial, comfortable seats, front and rear, are supportive but also a bit softer than the generally firm seats in this segment. Some rear seat occupants complained that the rear seat back angle was too reclined. A good seating position combines with larger than average windows to deliver better visibiltity than many other cars in this category. Abundant legroom for those sitting upfront with substantial rear seat legroom for this class. The trunk is very tight for a car of this size. Air-conditioning output is adequate but drivers cannot select a temperature cooler than 18C, even when the ambient temperature is below that figure.


Comments
Engine options are limited to 300 or 400 horsepower versions of the 3L-V6 turbo. Power goes to all four wheels via a seven-speed automatic transmission in all cases.  

Pricing

The Q50 is marketed in a slightly bizarre blizzard of trims for such a low-volume car. The Pure base model is nicely equipped, but if you want leather seating you must move up to the Signature trim, which is good value. The Signature ProASSIST upgrade, which includes blind spot monitors, a 360 degree screen system, heated front seats and steering wheel and rear self-stopping if an object is detected; equipment that should be standard at this price, is very expensive. The Sport model, with Dynamic Digital active suspension, upgraded brakes and a name-brand audio system, is well equipped but overpriced. The base Red Sport is oddly configured and lacks some expected active safety and luxury features. A base Red Sport is priced nearly $11,000 higher than a simlarly-equipped base Signature model. The Red Sport ProACTIVE includes the expected active safety equipment but is about $1000 overpriced. The Q50 is an exceptional lease value for 2020.    

Reliability
Average to better than average reliability predicted. Maintenance is less expensive than German-branded luxury cars. Run-flat tires permit the driver to continue after a puncture but can rarely be repaired and are expensive to replace. Repairs to the steer by wire system could be expensive once the warranty is over. 

Specifications


Body Style:  4SD
Occupants:  2/3

Engines:
3L-V6 T (300 HP*, 400 HP) 

Transmissions: 7A 
Drive Layout: All-wheel drive

City Fuel Economy:  12.5L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  8.7L/100 km
Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning, including pedestrians and autonomous emergency braking. Optional blind spot and lane departure warnings and rear collision prevention autonomous braking 
Additional airbags: None

Warranty: 4/100,000, 6/110,000
Current Generation Debut: 2014
Country of Origin:  Japan

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: NR

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: NR

Head/Seat: G

Rear: NR

Headlight: M

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Jaguar XE

 

 

 

What’s new
The XE sat out the 2019 model year but the 2020 model returns with a significant mid-cycle refresh. Updates include a new fascia and L.E.D. headlamps up front and a revised rear fascia and tailights as well. Cabin alterations include upgraded cabin materials, a TFT gauge cluster, a redesigned dash centre stack with a new 10.4 inch infotainment screen, rotary type climate controls, a camera-based rearview mirror, a restyled centre console and a joystick gear selector in place of the previous rotating oner. The iOS/Android cellphone interface is standard for 2020. With the turbodiesel and V6 engines discontinued, only the 2L four-cylinder gasoline engine returns for 2020.  

Comments
The XE marked Jaguar’s return to the compact luxury market it abandoned when production of the ill-fated X-Type ended in 2008. The XE was supposed to be Jaguar's entry into the high-volume compact luxury sedan segment, but sales never really took off.  
 
Two versions of Jaguar's Ingenium 2L turbo four, with 247 and 296 horsepower, are available. Power reaches all wheels via an eight-speed automatic transmission.
The XE's exterior dimensions are in the same ballpark as major competitors such as the BMW 3 Series, Lexus IS and Mercedes C-Class. Described as “aluminum intensive” the XE’s structure is all-alloy, with the doors and trunk lid being made of steel, not, according to Jaguar, as a cost-saving measure, but for weight distribution. The XE’s recent update improved the look, feel and function of the cabin but didn't fix its poor packaging. Cabin space is competitive upfront but rear seat legroom is very tight for this segment and not really suited for adults. 
Driven briefly by the APA, the R Dynamic model had, no pun intended, cat-like reflexes. While not silky smooth, the 2L turbo four is incredibly energetic and eager to move the XE with alacrity in normal drive mode; taking on a fierce snarl when Dynamic mode is engaged. The conventional eight-speed automatic transmission is ably matched to the 2L turbo four. Though some would prefer the steering to require more effort to turn, it is very precise and gives drivers tremendous feedback and to what is happening below the tires. Braking is linear and progressive, with great feel. The suspension, combining relentless grip and a firmly supple ride, is a paragon and a role model other makers need to follow. While the engine sounds a bit raucous at town speeds, it fades into the background when cruising. 


Pricing
The least expensive XE, the 247 horsepower 2L gas turbo SE P250, is priced at $49,900. The SE Dynamic S300, bears a $55,800 MSRP. Other than an additional 49 horsepower, there is little additional content to account for the $5900 price boost. Like a number of other European-branded luxury cars, expected safety features like high-speed emergency braking, adaptive cruise control with stop and go and blind spot monitors, are optional. The Jaguar Canada build configurator does not offer monthly payment information so it is not possible to assess lease value.   

Reliability
Not rated due to the small number of XEs sold. Reliability should be at least as good as German-branded rivals. No powertrain coverage past four years 80,000 km.

Specifications


Body Style:  4SD
Occupants:  2/3

Engines:
2L-4 T (247 HP and 296 HP*)  

Transmissions: 8A 
Drive Layout: All-wheel drive

City Fuel Economy:  10.7L/100 km

Highway Fuel Economy:  7.7L/100 km


Active Safety Features: Standard autonomous emergency braking and a lane keep assist system. Optional blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings and adaptive cruise control
Additional airbags: None

Warranty: 4/80,000 with no powertrain coverage past 80,000 km
Current Generation Debut:  2017
Country of Origin:  England

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: NR

Mod. Front: NR

Side: NR

Roof: NR

Sm. Front Pass.: NR

Head/Seat: NR

Rear: NR

Headlight: NR

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Lexus ES350 and ES300h

 


 

 

What’s new
The iOS-Andriod cellphone interface is standard for 2020. The audio systems have been updated. The Lexus Enform system now comes with a 10 year subscription. Hybrid: The warranty on the battery pack has increased from eight years/160,000 kilometres to 10 years/240,000 kilometres.
The ES is built on what Lexus refers to as the K (G-AK) platform, which is a rebranded version of the Toyota New Generation Architecture that underpins most new Toyotas. The ES is built on the same wheelbase as the Toyota Avalon.
The new ES is fronted by the latest iteration of the Lexus "Spindle" grille, with the rest of the car resembling a cross between the previous-generation ES and the previous LS super luxury sedan. The cabin is fronted by a dashboard featuring a small gauge pod containing a  speedometer surrounded by a tachometer and flanked on one side by a fuel readout and the other side by a temperature indicator. The top centre of the dash is dominated by a large info screen, which is controlled but an infuriating touch-pad that is too distracting to be used in a car. The cabin style on the luxury themed models, is both elegant and visually calming. The cabin design of the F Sport trims is carefully assembled but is not overtly luxurious compared with the sumptuous cabins of the non-sporting models. While the front seating position seems tighter than it is in the related Avalon, there is abundant legroom up front and in the rear, and the seats are very comfortable.

Pricing
The ES350 base model is nicely equipped but lacks expected luxury and safety equipment and few ES intenders pick it. Most buyers pick the Premium trim, which adds a heated steering wheel, navigation, a 12.3 inch infotainment screen as well as blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors. The Luxury model, needed to attain leather seating, is overpriced. Buyers seem to be able to reconcile the idea of luxury with vinyl upholstery, and don't step up to the Luxury trim, which is the least expensive model to offer leather. Compared with the F Sport 1, the F Sport 2 is overpriced. Hybrid: the supplement required to move into an ES300h is $2000. The ES350 is a very good lease value for 2020. 

Reliability
Predicted reliability is above average. Servicing costs are low for the luxury segment. 

Specifications


Body Style:  4SD
Occupants:  2/3

Engines:
2.5L-4 H (215 HP)*, 3.5L-V6 (302 HP)

Transmissions: 8A*, CVT 
Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive

City Fuel Economy:  5.5L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  5.2L/100 km
Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning, including pedestrians and cyclists, autonomous emergency braking, and active cruise control. Optional blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings 

Additional airbags: Knee airbag for the driver a front passenger seat-mounted airbag
Warranty:4/80,000, 6/110,000, 8/160,000 (hybrid components)
Current Generation Debut:  2019
Country of Origin:  Japan

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: G

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Lexus IS

 


 

 

What’s new
The Blackline appearance package is now available on the IS350.
Comments
The cabin, fronted by a clear gauge package and a vaguely 1980's BMW instrument panel, looks conservative and tasteful. Rear legroom is class competitive. Engine offerings include a 2L turbo four rated at 241 horsepower, and a 3.5L V6 that produces 260 and 311 horsepower in the IS300 and IS350 respectively. The 2L turbo sends power to the rear wheels via an eight-speed automatic transmission, with the exclusively all-wheel drive V6 models using a six-speed automatic.

Pricing

Except for the super low-volume IS 300 RWD, most IS models feature all-wheel drive for 2020. An IS300, with a V6 and all-wheel drive, is only $2550 more expensive than the base 2L rear-wheel drive model. The IS is marketed in regular and F Sport trim themes. On the IS300 AWD, the Premium trim, with a sunroof, blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors, a heated steering wheel and front seat chillers, is very good value as is the Luxury trim that includes navigation and a variety of convenience features. Compared to the base IS300 AWD, the The F Sport looks a bit pricey but the F Sport 2 is priced to reflect the value of its additional content. The IS300 AWD Luxury and the IS350 AWD are similarly equipped, with the more powerful IS350 engine adding $4700 to the price. Moving from an IS300 F Sport 2 to the IS350 AWD F Sport 2 will set you back $4300. The IS is an exceptional value lease for 2020. 

Reliability
Above average reliability. Cheaper service costs and better durability than a comparable German-branded car make it better suited to people who buy their cars and keep them for the long haul, rather than lease them.

Specifications


Body Style:  4SD
Occupants:  2/3

Engines:
2L-4 T (241 HP), 3.5L-V6 (260 HP*: !S300, 311 HP: IS350)

Transmissions: 6A, 8A 
Drive Layout: Rear-wheel drive, all-wheel  drive*

City Fuel Economy:  12.3L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  9.1L/100 km

Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning and autonomous emergency braking, lane departure warning with steering assist and active cruise control. Optional blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings. 

Additional airbags: Knee airbags for both front occupants and outboard rear seat airbags


Warranty: 4/80,000, 6/110,000
Current Generation Debut:  2014
Country of Origin: Japan

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: A

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Lincoln Continental

 


 

 

What’s new
There are only minor packaging updates for the 2020 Continental. 

Performance
With 400 horsepower, the 3L turbo V6 powering our Continental test car delivered abundant, flexible power regardless of speed. While not necessarily a noisy engine, the sounds it emits are not that compelling (an issue with the 2.7L version of this engine as well) and does diminish refinement somewhat. Lincoln should either retune the exhaust to make the car sound better or throw enough sound-proofing at it to render the engine silent. The six-speed automatic transmission is notable only in the way it gets its job done without fuss and demontrates that six gears are enough.
The suspension has variable damping permitting the driver to select Soft, Normal and Sport settings. Soft delivers a very compliant ride which is accompanied by nautical heaving that was once a hallmark of domestic luxury cars. With good bump absorption and steady handling, the Normal setting achieves an excellent balance between ride and handling in a car that never forgets its mission as a vehicular expression of confident luxury. The Sport setting sharpens the reflexes of the Continental but does lack the supple bump absorbency of the normal setting. The Continental’s steering is nicely weighted, decently quick without a trace of dartiness, and tracks flawlessly on the highway.
With impressive passenger space and and sinfully supportive seating, the Continental would be a pleasure to inhabit on a continental journey. The dual format sunroof floods the cabin with light but wind buffeting with it open is such that most drivers will leave it closed. The sound quality of the Revel Ultima audio system is disappointing.

Comments
The driver faces a transistor-film-technology (TFT) instrument cluster with a speedometer, tachometer and a configurable information panel. Interestingly, only the speed range the car is travelling in is brightly highlighted on the speedometer, with the rest of the dial remaining in quasi shadow. The instrumentation is very easy to scan but the total display is quite discreet in size, which perhaps reinforces that the Continental is not meant to be a performance car, but a high-luxury conveyance. The climate and audio controls are located in a wood-ringed panel in the dash centre stack. Controls for both audio and climate are segregated and are straightforward and easy to manipulate. Climate fan speed is controlled by a large knob, temperature can be altered using slick-acting toggles and crystal like buttons activate seat heating and cooling. The pushbuttons for the transmission selector are located on the dash immediately left of the infotainment screen, and become logical as you get used to them. The rest of the cabin, with supple leather seating, elegant bright trim accents and contemporary matte-finished open pore wood, is very attractive. The sole jarring element inside our Continental Reserve was the woodgrain on the console storage bin door that didn’t match the grain of its surround.

Pricing

All Continentals feature all-wheel drive. The 2.7L turbo V6 is standard, with a 3L turbo V6 optional at $3250. The Continental is available in a single, comprehensively-equipped Reserve trim, which has a number of option packages. The rear seat package on the Reserve trim results in pampered rear passengers but leaves the wallet of its buyer significantly thinner and is poor value. Those holding a Ford Fleet number can order a slightly decontented Continental, referred to as the "Livery" model, powered by a normally-aspirated 3.7L V6. With only 177 units sold in 2019, the Continental has, despite its excellence, been a flop in the showroom. Savage depreciation expected. The Continental is a good value lease for 2020 which will remove the threat of rapid depreciation. The Continental may end us being a fantastic used car buy in three or four years.    

Reliability
Not rated as too few have been sold. Leasing for no longer than the four year/80,000 km basic warranty or the purchase of an extended warranty, are strongly recommended. Unproven turbo engines. Durability of the electronic touch exterior and interior door handles is unknown. 

Specifications


Body Style:  4SD
Occupants:  2/3

Engines:
2.7L-V6 T (335 HP estimated)*, 3L-V6 T (400 HP)  

Transmissions: 6A 
Drive Layout: all-wheel drive

City Fuel Economy:  14/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy: 9.5L/100 km
Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking,  blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors and a lane keep assistance system.
Additional airbags: No info available

Warranty: 4/80,000, 6/110,000
Current Generation Debut:  2017
Country of Origin:  United States 

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: P

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Lincoln MKZ

 


 

 

What’s new
Not expected back after 2019, the MKZ returns for one last lap in 2020. The high-performance turbocharged V6 model has been discontinued. 

Performance
The MKZ's 2L turbocharged four is quick and refined and nicely matched to its six-speed automatic transmission. The precise, nicely-weighted steering is part of the Lincoln Drive Control that links the steering, stability and traction controls with the Continuously Controlled Damping to optimize ride and handling. All of Lincoln's electronic devices combine to deliver a compliant ride and confident handling that befits a luxury touring car. The conventional MKZ is very quiet, with subdued engine, road and wind noise. The hybrid model performs well enough and is economical but lacks refinement and undermines the luxury experience the conventional MKZ delivers. The MKZ eschews a conventional gear selector in favour of pushbuttons located on the left side of the dash centre stack. This is confusing at first but works well enough once you are acclimatized to it. Tall body sides, small windows and big roof pillars limit outward visibility. This is further exacerbated if the car is equipped with the massive glass sunroof that covers about half of the already small rear window when the roof is fully open. The MKZ is not the easiest car to get in and out of.
Like designs of the Bauhaus movement, the MKZ's cabin is visually calming and fashioned from luxurious materials. Instrumentation is by the same components as navigation-equipped Fords and underwhelming for a high-end car. Seat comfort is good and cabin space is competitive with other cars in the mid-size luxury class. Inflatable rear seatbelts are an innovative safety feature but they make fastening the seatbelts very awkward. Reasonable trunk space. Good exterior paint and panel fit.

Comments
The Ford Motor Company neglected Lincoln while it owned Aston-Martin, Jaguar, Land-Rover and Volvo. Devoid of attention, Lincoln languished, and became the purveyors of lightly altered mainstream Ford models. This situation reached its nadir with the previous MKZ, which, while a good car, was essentially a Ford Fusion with different end caps and a nicer cabin.
After jettisoning its luxury brands, Ford decided to revive Lincoln as a premium brand and create unique vehicles which could justify higher prices than what Lincoln used to charge.
Like its predecessor, the current MKZ is based on the same platform as the Ford Fusion, but shares no exterior panels and few cabin elements with its Ford sibling. Exterior styling is visually spare, but not plain, and is highlighted by some very carefully-considered bright highlights.
The sole conventional engine is a turbocharged 2L four that produces 245 horsepower. Combined hybrid horsepower is 188. The hybrid is exclusively front-wheel drive with all-wheel drive standard on the conventional model. The 2L is hooked to a conventional six-speed automatic transmission but the hybrid uses a continuously variable transmission.

Pricing

All-wheel drive is standard on the conventionally-powered 2L MKZ but is not offered on the hybrid model. The hybrid is priced the same as a 2L of the same trim but lacks all-wheel drive, which is about a $2000 value. The $7000 Luxury package is priced roughly twice the value of its content. Savage depreciation, with a five-year old MKZ worth 40 percent less than a Lexus ES350 of the same year and condition. Reasonable value leasing for 2020. Leasing would be a way to avoid steep depreciation. 
Reliability
New vehicle, not rated. Complex electronic systems might make a Ford extended warranty a prudent purchase if you plan to keep your car past the warranty period. Some problems reported with the turbo engine. The hybrid might be a surer bet.

Specifications


Body Style:  4SD
Occupants:  2/3

Engines:
2L-4  T (245 HP)*, 2L-4 H (141 HP gasoline engine, 188 HP combined) 

Transmissions: 6A*, CVT 
Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy: 12.1L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy: 8.4L/100 km
Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning including pedestrians, blind spot, rear cross traffic and lane departure warnings and a lane keep assist system. 
Additional airbags: No information available

Warranty: 4/80,000, 6/110,000, 8/160,000 (hybrid components)
Current Generation Debut:  2013
Country of Origin:  Mexico and United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Rear: NR

Headlight: P

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Mercedes-Benz C-Class

 


 

 

What’s new
Front seat coolers are a new option this year. V8 models are hooked up to a nine-speed automatic transmission for 2020. 
Performance
Driven in C300 sedan form, which comprises the bulk of C-Class sales in Canada, our test unit was powered by a 255 horsepower 2L turbocharged four-cylinder engine. With 273 lb-ft of torque, the 2L turbo furnishes abundant power and commendable flexibility. Refinement, while lacking the more sonorous soundtrack of the previous-generation car that featured a standard V6, is acceptable and doesn't constantly remind you that you paid for a V6 but got a four. The nine-speed automatic transmission is notable for just getting on with its job without fuss. Even equipped with an overly-sporty wheel, tire and suspension package, steering on our C300 was no better than reasonably precise. Equipped with the Sport package, the Active suspension option and the optional AMG 19 inch wheels, the C300's ride bypasses harsh and transitions to flinty, crashy and jarring. The extreme impacts excite cabin trim squeaks are well as protest groans from the structure of the car. The Sport package should be avoided at all costs. Mercedes cars used to be exemplars of predictable handling, good road holding with some lean and unflappable ride characteristics. What happened? Some observers claim the deplorable ride is caused by the run-flat tires fitted to the cars, but inept spring and damper rates unsuited to use on North American road surfaces are the real causes. Handling is crisp and predictable but is no compensation for the bone-jarring ride. 
While the cabin design is modern and looks striking, it becomes less and less impressive as you spend more time inside the car. While the interior style is leaps ahead of the previous C-Class and many of the cabin fittlngs are more luxurious than previously, some pieces, like the climate controls, look cheap and feel nasty when manipulated, as does the lidded bin at the base of the centre console. The faux piano black trim pieces are unconvincing; opt for the real wood trim available at no extra charge. Seating is comfortable front and rear and rear seat occupants have enough legroom to keep them quiet. The power seat controls, a representation of the seat and mounted on the upper doors, look ueber cool but in fact don't work as well as conventional controls that are located on the outboard side of the seat base. The HVAC fan adjustment toggle has a delayed action and drivers are constantly over-compensating for fan speed increases and decreases because of the delay. The Mercedes Comand system, which controls a variety of functions, is an unfathomable apparatus that needs a serious rethink. The air-conditioning on our tester performed just adequately and emitted an unpleasant odour as well.   
In a recent group vehicle test including the Audi A4, Infiniti Q50 and the Genesis G70, the C-Class was ranked dead last by a large margin. It appears people are buying the C300 not because of its performance, which is disappointing, but because of the prestige of the brand.

Comments
The C-Class sedan marked a return to elegance for Mercedes and also became the first C-Class to comfortably house four adults. The dashboard contains big clear gauges that flank an electronic display and simple-looking but multi-buttoned climate controls. An aftermarket-looking info screen takes pride of place at the top centre of the dash. The base C300 is powered by a 2L turbo four that produces 255 horsepower and 273 lb-ft of torque; a twin turbo V6 (marketed as the AMG C43), develops 385 horsepower. The V8 AMG C63 and AMG C63S models are rear-wheel drive only and thus essentially three season cars in Canada. The coupe and cabriolet versions of the C63 are only offered with the 503 horsepower S version of the 4L turbo V8. All models use a nine-speed automatic transmission. 

Pricing 
The C-Class is offered in sedan, wagon, coupe and cabriolet body styles. On the mainstream 2L turbo model, marketed as the C300 model, the station wagon body costs $1300 more than the sedan, the coupe commands a $3700 premium over the sedan and the cabriolet is priced $8100 higher than the coupe. The C-Class is sold in a single trim with a variety of option packages. Of the packages, the Sport package is priced to reflect the value of its content but most other packages are overpriced. Expensive leather upholstery and metallic paint surcharges. The 3L turbo V6, marketed at the AMG C43, is priced up to $13,900 higher than a C300 of the same body style. The supplement charged for the V8 turbo AMG C63 models places them in a different market segment than even the pricey AMG C43. The APA strongly recommends the Prepaid Maintenance Package ($1199 for three years and $1799 for four years for the C300, and $1799 and $2799 respectively for the C43 and C63 versions) that covers services at 20,000 km intervals. The Mercedes-Benz build configurator does not offer payment information details precise enough to determine lease value. 

Reliability
The C-Class should exhibit average reliability for the first three years, deteriorating after that. Four year/80,000 km bumper to bumper warranty with no additional powertrain coverage. American and most Japanese luxury brands offer six years for the powertrain. The pre-paid scheduled service plans offered by Mercedes-Benz are strongly recommended. With the short powertrain warranty, C-Class intenders should only lease this vehicle.   

Specifications


Body Style:  2CP, 4SD*
Occupants:  2/3

Engines:
2L-4 T (255 HP C300)*, 3L-V6 T (385 HP C43), 4L-V8 T (C63: 469 HP, C63 S: 503 HP) 

Transmissions: 9A* 
Drive Layout: All-wheel drive, rear-wheel drive (C63 only)

City Fuel Economy: 11L/100 km

Highway Fuel Economy: 7.3L/100 km


Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning with autonomous emergency braking, blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings. Optional active cruise control with stop and go and an active lane keep assist system. 

Additional airbags: Driver's side knee airbag

Warranty: 4/80,000 with no powertrain coverage afterward.

Current Generation Debut:  2015
Country of Origin: United States, Germany

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: A

NHTSA Rating:


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